The Clark Exhibition

CLAUDE & FRANÇOIS-XAVIER LALANNE: NATURE TRANSFORMED

MAY 9–NOVEMBER 1, 2020

The first U.S. museum exhibition of Claude and François-Xavier Lalanne’s work in more than 40 years brings their imaginative and powerful sculptures to the Clark. 
Nature Transformed reveals the artistic imagination, impressive command of technique, and enduring visual appeal of this husband and wife team, who often exhibited together as “Les Lalanne.” The works include sculpture and furniture by both artists and a selection of Claude Lalanne’s wildly inventive flatware and jewelry. 

NIKOLAI ASTRUP:
VISIONS OF NORWAY

JUNE 13–SEPTEMBER 13, 2020
The Clark presents the first North American exhibition focused on the Norwegian painter Nikolai Astrup, who deftly wove tradition and innovation into his artistic production. Astrup is considered one of Norway’s most important artists, yet he is largely unknown outside of his homeland. Nikolai Astrup: Visions of Norway features more than eighty-five works celebrating this brilliant painter, printmaker, and horticulturalist.

GROUND/WORK

JUNE 27, 2020–SPRING 2021


The Clark’s first outdoor exhibition, Ground/work, features site-responsive installations by six contemporary artists presented in locations across the pastoral setting of its 140-acre campus. International artists Kelly Akashi, Nairy Baghramian, Jennie C. Jones, Eva LeWitt, Analia Saban, and Haegue Yang were invited to conceive of a response to the Clark’s landscape and to be in active dialogue with the natural environment and setting.

The exhibition will be on view across the four seasons and will be free and open to the public. 

LIN MAY SAEED:
ARRIVAL OF THE ANIMALS

JUNE 27–OCTOBER 12, 2020


The Clark presents the first museum solo exhibition of artist Lin May Saeed. Throughout her career, Saeed (b. 1973, Würzburg, Germany) has focused on the lives of animals and the human-animal relationship. She is a sculptor of free-standing figures and reliefs who favors “poor” materials such as polystyrene to create works that are both exquisitely delicate and, given their chemical composition, likely to outlast human civilization. She also creates sculptures in distinctive formats such as back-lit paper silhouettes and welded steel gate-like forms.